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Healthcare News Archive

Healthcare News Archive

Trends in Treating Distal Radius Fractures

Source: Healio Orthopedics

This update summarizes the numerous recently published investigations of distal radius fractures. The keyword “distal radius fracture” was used to query PubMed. Articles and related commentaries published in the Journal of Hand Surgery (American Volume), the Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume), and the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma from April 2014 through December 2015 were reviewed. Case series of fewer than 5 patients were excluded. The identified articles were summarized and broadly organized into biomechanics, imaging, surgical technique, and postoperative findings.

Review article

 

Nerve Conduction Studies for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Gold Standard or Unnecessary Evil?

Source: Healio Orthopedics

Carpal tunnel syndrome is defined by numbness and tingling in the median nerve distribution, nocturnal exacerbation of symptoms, and positive provocative testing (eg, Phalen test, Tinel's sign, compression test). For most patients, the presence of the classic signs and symptoms should be adequate for the diagnosis. However, many physicians order confirmatory testing and some insurance companies require the confirmatory testing prior to approving surgical treatment. The most commonly ordered test is a combination of nerve conduction studies and electromyography. As pressure increases on physicians to control health care–associated costs and implement evidence-based medicine into clinical practice, we must critically analyze the data regarding nerve conduction studies. Should they be considered the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, or are they unnecessary studies that increase costs and delay treatment?

Review article

 

Quantitative Anatomical Differences in the Shoulder

Source: Healio Orthopedics

This study explored the radiographic and anatomical differences in normal shoulders between men and women, as well as factors such as race, height, weight, and age. A total of 205 patients with documented normal anatomical radiographs comprised the study population. This study demonstrated precisely defined proximal humeral anatomical relationships and sizes using an advanced standardized imaging software program. With these data, orthopedic surgeons and implant designers can better understand the anatomy and glenohumeral relationships to re-create when performing total shoulder arthroplasty. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):155–160.]

Review article

 

Pumpkin Carving Tips

Source: American Society for Surgery of the Hand

Use caution during the Halloween season, and take steps to prevent hand injuries when carving.

"Every Halloween season we see four or five patients — both adults and children — who come into our office with severe injuries to their hands and fingers," says Jeffrey Wint, MD, an ASSH member from The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts in Springfield, Mass. "Treatment can often run three to four months, from the time of surgery through rehabilitation."

To prevent hand injuries, the ASSH suggests some safety tips:

Review article

 

Hands as we Age

Source: WebMD

What Happens to Your Hands as You Age?

You use your hands to do so many things: tie your shoes, open jars, drive, and use your phone, to name just a few. It’s hard to do much of anything without them, but as you get older, they can get weaker and less flexible. Some hand problems can even be signs of certain health conditions. Know what to look out for so you keep them in good shape. Including:

  • Grip Strength
  • Tremors
  • Arthritis
  • Age Spots
  • Skin Cancer
  • Bruising
  • Dupuytren’s Contracture

Review article

 

Just 45 minutes of exercise a week can benefit older adults with arthritis

Source: Medical News Today

A recent study reports that engaging in physical activity can reduce pain and help to maintain mobility and independence for older adults with arthritis, but current exercise recommendations are often unachievable for this population. Now, however, a new study finds that exercising for just 45 minutes a week is enough to reap the benefits.

Review article

 

Diabetes: Stimulating bone stem cells may improve fracture repair

Researchers have discovered a protein that stimulates bone stem cells in mice with diabetes so that the animals heal better after a fracture. They suggest that this could lead to a new treatment to improve bone repair in people with diabetes.

Review article

 

The secret behind the toughness of deer antlers

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the secret behind the toughness of deer antlers and how they can resist breaking during fights. The team looked at the antler structure at the 'nano-level', which is incredibly small, almost one thousandth of the thickness of a hair strand, and were able to identify the mechanisms at work, using state-of-the-art computer modelling and x-ray techniques.

Co-author Dr Ettore Barbieri, also from QMUL's School of Engineering and Materials Science, said: "Our next step is to create a 3D printed model with fibres arranged in staggered configuration and linked by an elastic interface.

The aim is to prove that additive manufacturing - where a prototype can be created a layer at a time - can be used to create damage resistant composite material."

Review article

 

Study of Rats provides insights on tendon overuse injuries

In research conducted in rats, investigators have shown for the first time the effect of rotator cuff tendon overuse, or tendinopathy, on surrounding tissues.

Review article

 

Bone loss may be linked to Alzheimer's disease

Fewer than 5 percent of cases of Alzheimer's disease have a clear genetic cause, making it hard to predict who will develop the devastating brain-wasting disorder. There is an urgent need to develop biomarkers and early treatments before the symptoms of decline take hold and destroy lives. Now, using a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, researchers discover a link between early bone loss and brain degeneration that may begin to address this need.

Review article

 

Osteoarthritis: New blood test detects early stages, study finds

There is currently no blood test for early-stage osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease where the cartilage that eases and cushions movement breaks down, causing pain, swelling, and problems moving the joint. Now, researchers at Warwick University in the United Kingdom have developed a blood test that can provide an early diagnosis of osteoarthritis and distinguish it from rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory joint diseases.

Review article

 

New "Fish Hook" Procedure for Mallet Finger

Source: Helio - Orthopedics

This study describes a new technique called the “fish hook” technique for the treatment of bony mallet finger. This technique catches the dorsal fragment with a bent K-wire shaped like a fish hook. Transarticular fixation is performed with another K-wire. This technique does not directly penetrate the bone fragment to prevent fragment comminution.

Review article

 

The Cholesterol Connection to Osteoarthritis

Source: Medical News Today (MNT)

High cholesterol might harm more than our cardiovascular systems. New research using animal models, published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests that high cholesterol levels trigger mitochondrial oxidative stress on cartilage cells, causing them to die, and ultimately leading to the development of osteoarthritis.

Review article

 

Marijuana Use and Bone Health

Source: Medical News Today (MNT)

New study finds that regular, heavy marijuana use may reduce bone density, increasing the risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures.

Review article

 

Distal Humerus Radiographs and Internal Fixation

Interpretation of Post-operative Distal Humerus Radiographs after Internal Fixation: Prediction of Later Loss of Fixation

Source: Journal of Hand Surgery

A total of 232 orthopedic residents and surgeons from around the world evaluated 24 anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of distal humerus fractures on a Web-based platform to predict which implants would loosen or break.

Review article

 

Prevention of Thumb Web Space Contracture with Multiplanar External Fixation

Source: Techniques in Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery

Thumb web space contracture following hand trauma can be disabling with numerous reconstructive procedures existing to correct the resultant deformity. In this study, following marked soft tissue injury to the hand the Stryker Hoffmann II Micro External Fixator System was used to link the first and second metacarpals by a multiplanar system using 1.6 or 2.0 mm self-drilling half-pins and 3 mm carbon fiber connecting rods. This facilitated placement of the thumb in maximal palmar abduction and allowed adjustment of thumb position throughout the postoperative period.

Review article

 

Consider overuse injuries in female youth athlete

Source: Healio Orthopedics Today

Since passage of Title IX in 1972, a comprehensive federal law that required gender equity in every education program or activity receiving federal funding, the societal norms in sports have changed. Female participation in athletics is at an all-time high.

Review article

 

Play 'Pokemon go' without landing in the ER

Source: Medical Xpress

Just about every millennial seems to be out and about with a smartphone in pursuit of digital monsters via the "Pokemon Go" game. But players distracted by their smartphones risk injury from mishaps like walking into traffic or tripping over a curb.

Review article

 

Keys to building and maintaining bone strength

Source: Medical Xpress

Osteoporosis is on the rise as 75 million baby boomers approach their golden years. Yet many patients and physicians are not aware of what they can do to prevent, slow down and treat the condition, which happens when holes develop in bone, creating a risk of fractures from falls.

Review article

 

Tommy John surgeries increasing for youth athletes

Source: Medical News Today

Surgeries related to overuse elbow injuries, i.e. Tommy John Surgery, are more common among youth athletes than previously believed, according to research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.

Review article

 

Study indicates hand, upper-extremity surgery may be safely performed in outpatient setting

Source: Helio, Orthopedics Today

Investigators of a study recently published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found a low adverse event rate after hand or upper extremity surgeries performed at a freestanding ambulatory surgery center, which they note demonstrates that these surgeries can be completed safety in an outpatient setting.

Review article

 

Hand Dominance and Common Hand Conditions

Source: Helio, Orthopedics

Upper extremity disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DEQ), lateral epicondylitis (LE), hand osteoarthritis (OA), and trigger finger (TF) are common diagnoses that lead patients to seek a hand surgeon for evaluation and treatment.1,2 Although there is a common perception that these disorders should affect the dominant hand more often, clinical experience suggests that this is not always the case; it is not seen as unusual for these conditions to present in the nondominant hand.

Review article

 

High Triglycerides Tied to Fractures in Middle Aged Women

Source: Medscape

Women around the age of menopause with elevated triglycerides may also have an elevated risk of fracture, a U.S. study suggests.

Researchers followed more than 2,000 premenopausal women with no history of bone fractures for nearly 15 years. By the end of that time, some women with high triglycerides were more than twice as likely as others to have experienced a fracture.

Review article

 

FDA requests additional information to address data gaps for consumer hand sanitizers

Source: MNT (Medical News Today)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a proposed rule requesting additional scientific data to support the safety and effectiveness of certain active ingredients used in topical consumer antiseptic rubs (including hand sanitizers) marketed over-the-counter (OTC). The FDA's request for more data is intended to help the agency ensure that regular use of these products does not present unknown safety and efficacy concerns, and does not mean the FDA believes these products are ineffective or unsafe.

Review article